Dark Developments Where Knowledge Meets Power

26Mar/120

BBOX – Belgacom BBOX Bridge

Posted by Dark#Basics

BBOX - Belgacom BBOX Bridge
It's quite easy to set-up a B-BOX into Bridge mode once you know it.

Bridging is a forwarding technique used in packet-switched computer networks. Unlike routing, bridging makes no assumptions about where in a network a particular address is located. Instead, it depends on flooding and examination of source addresses in received packet headers to locate unknown devices. Once a device has been located, its location is recorded in a table where the source address is stored so as to avoid the need for further flooding. The utility of bridging is limited by its dependence on flooding, and is thus only used in local area networks.

1. Connect to the router and login into the Admin Interface. By default the interface can be found by surfing to 192.168.1.1.

2. Select Advanced Settings, ‘Network Interfaces’ in the Menu.


3. Select WAN PPPoE, select Disable and apply the changes by selecting OK.

Once the b-box has disabled the Network Interface the modem will be in bridging mode. Do note that the device after the modem will need to provide the PPPoE authentication by using the username and password provided by the ISP.

Filed under: Networking No Comments
23Feb/120

Aerohive – Find Serial Number Through SSH

Posted by Dark#Basics

When using the AeroHive Online Manager you'll need to (re-)add the Aerohive Serial Number in the Redirector when (re)installing the AP. But what do you do when the AP is already mounted on the wall and you can't find the serial somewhere else ? It's possible to find out the serial number using SSH and the following command.

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AP1#show hw-info
9Nov/110

Aerohive – Reconnecting AP’s After HiveManager Update

Posted by Dark#Basics

Aerohive - Reconnecting AP's After HiveManager Update

After updating the HiveManager Online OS some of our APs where not connecting to the HiveManager Online. This is because these APs where not connected during the upgrade procces and thus they didn't recieve the new settings regarding CAPWAP. This can be easily fixed by setting up an SSH connection to the APs in question and running the following commands:

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APX#no hive manager
APX#hive manager "hm-useastXX-XX.earohive.com" primary
APX#no capwap client enable
APX#capwap client enable

Note: This is the hostname of the current HiveManager Online WebPortal.

Reboot the AP if necessary using the reboot command from within the CLI. After that check the current status using:

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APX#show capwap client
24Aug/110

CISCO – Static VLAN Configuration

Posted by Dark#Basics

Cisco - Static VLAN Configuration
As most of you know a VLAN or Virtual Local Area Network is a group of hosts with a common set of requirements that communicate as they are on the same broadcast domain, regardless of there location. It essentially allows machines to be grouped together even if they aren't attached on the same network switch.

VLANs are used to segment services that are normally provided by routers. VLANs address issues such as security and network management. By definition, switches do not bridge IP traffic between VLANs as it would violate the VLAN broadcast domain principle.

By using VLANs, one can control traffic patterns and react quickly to relocations. VLANs provide the flexibility to adapt to changes in network requirements and allow for simplified administration.

VLAN Memberships
There are two common approaches to assign VLAN membership namely using Static VLANs and Dynamic VLANs.

Static VLANs are also referred as post-based VLANs. As a device enters the network, the device automatically assumes the VLAN of the port. If the user changes ports and needs access to the same VLAN, the network administrator must manually make a port-to-VLAN assignment for the new connection.

Dynamic VLANs are created through the use of software. With a VLAN Management Policy Server (VMPS), an administrator can assign switch ports to VLANs dynamically based on information such as the source MAC address of the device connected to the port or the username used to log onto that device. As a device enters the network, the device queries a database for VLAN membership.

Adding a VLAN

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ExampleSwitch#config t
ExampleSwitch(config)#vlan 666
ExampleSwitch(config-vlan)#name Employees
ExampleSwitch(config-vlan)#end

Static VLAN Configuration

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ExampleSwitch(config)#interface fa 0/1
ExampleSwitch(config-if)#switchport mode access
ExampleSwitch(config-if)#switchport access vlan 666
ExampleSwitch(config-if)#end

Managing VLANs
After configuring a VLAN, you can validate the configuration by using different show commands.

Show VLAN brief gives an overview of the defined VLANs, there status and the ports.

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ExampleSwitch#show vlan brief
 
VLAN Name                             Status    Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- -------------------------------
1    default                          active    Fa0/2, Fa0/3, Fa0/4, Fa0/5
Fa0/6, Fa0/7, Fa0/8, Fa0/9
Fa0/10, Fa0/11, Fa0/12, Fa0/13
Fa0/14, Fa0/15, Fa0/16, Fa0/17
Fa0/18, Fa0/19, Fa0/20, Fa0/21
Fa0/22, Fa0/23, Fa0/24
666  Employees                        active    Fa0/1
1002 fddi-default                     active
1003 token-ring-default               active
1004 fddinet-default                  active
1005 trnet-default                    active

Show vlan id gives an overview of the status and ports for the specified vlan id.

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ExampleSwitch#show vlan id 666
 
VLAN Name                             Status    Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- -------------------------------
666  Employees                        active    Fa0/1
 
VLAN Type  SAID       MTU   Parent RingNo BridgeNo Stp  BrdgMode Trans1 Trans2
---- ----- ---------- ----- ------ ------ -------- ---- -------- ------ ------
666  enet  100666     1500  -      -      -        -    -        0      0

Show vlan name gives an overview of the status and ports for the specified vlan name.

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ExampleSwitch#show vlan name Employees
 
VLAN Name                             Status    Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- -------------------------------
666  Employees                        active    Fa0/1
 
VLAN Type  SAID       MTU   Parent RingNo BridgeNo Stp  BrdgMode Trans1 Trans2
---- ----- ---------- ----- ------ ------ -------- ---- -------- ------ ------
666  enet  100666     1500  -      -      -        -    -        0      0

Show interfaces switchport gives a detailed overview of the settings for the specified interface.

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ExampleSwitch#show interfaces fa 0/1 switchport
Name: Fa0/1
Switchport: Enabled
Administrative Mode: static access
Operational Mode: down
Administrative Trunking Encapsulation: dot1q
Operational Trunking Encapsulation: native
Negotiation of Trunking: Off
Access Mode VLAN: 666 (Employees)
Trunking Native Mode VLAN: 1 (default)
Voice VLAN: none
Administrative private-vlan host-association: none
Administrative private-vlan mapping: none
Administrative private-vlan trunk native VLAN: none
Administrative private-vlan trunk encapsulation: dot1q
Administrative private-vlan trunk normal VLANs: none
Administrative private-vlan trunk private VLANs: none
Operational private-vlan: none
Trunking VLANs Enabled: ALL
Pruning VLANs Enabled: 2-1001
Capture Mode Disabled
Capture VLANs Allowed: ALL
Protected: false
Appliance trust: none
Filed under: Cisco, Networking No Comments